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Beyond the Source: The environmental, economic and community benefits of source water protection

2017
Authors: Abell R., et al.
Organizations/Sources: The Nature Conservancy
New report analyzes 4,000 cities to demonstrate the health, climate and biodiversity benefits of source water protection
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Last Modified
Feb 01, 2017
Viewed
1025 times

Caring for Our Natural Assets: An Ecosystem Services Perspective

2007
This paper examines an emerging perspective that describes ecosystems as natural assests that support human health and well-being. The perspective serves as both a conservation approach and an extension of ecosystem management, involving the connection of ecosystem services to the people who benefit, in some cases with an assigned market value. Forest conservation that considers the supply and delivery of ecosystem services will enhance the health and resiliency of ecosystems, engage and serve a broader public, and attract private investment and leadership in a common effort to safeguard natural systems.
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Last Modified
Apr 22, 2011
Viewed
2674 times

Hiking Trails in America: Pathways to Health

2016
Organizations/Sources: American Hiking Society
Walking is the key to numerous health benefits that are life-changing. Benefits such as a healthy body weight, lower blood pressure, and even an improved mental outlook. But walking sounds so...pedestrian. So American Hiking Society encourages walkers and would-be-walkers to mix it up a little and go for a hike—even an urban hike.
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Last Modified
Feb 01, 2018
Viewed
227 times

Light Pollution: Adverse Health Effects of Nightime Lighting

2012
Summary of the American Medical Association report that identifies the dangers of artificial light to humans.
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Last Modified
Aug 22, 2017
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428 times

Measuring the Health Effects of Sprawl: A National Analysis of Physical Activity, Obesity and Chronic Disease

2003
People living in counties marked by sprawling development are more likely to walk less, weigh more, and suffer from high blood pressure than people who live in less sprawling counties. These results hold true after controlling for factors such as age, education, gender, and race and ethnicity. In addition to presenting research findings, this report summarizes recent research done by others on the links between the way we’ve built our communities, physical activity, and health,as well as present recommendations for change and resources for those interested in further exploration of this topic.
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Last Modified
Aug 18, 2015
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3346 times

Quantifying the Contribution of Public Parks to Physical Activity and Health

2014
Because public parks contribute to health and well-being, primarily by serving as an important venue for physical activity, it is in the best interests of park administrators to have a method to measure this contribution. While parks offer health benefits beyond physical activity, physical activity can be objectively measured and is an excellent way to demonstrate the value of parks. Nearly 11 percent of all deaths and a significant proportion of chronic conditions, including heart disease, diabetes, and cancer, among Americans are directly attributable to physical inactivity.
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Last Modified
Aug 18, 2015
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1621 times

Relationship Between Urban Sprawl and Physical Activity, Obesity & Morbidity

2003
Urban design could be significantly associated with some forms of physical activity and some health outcomes. Although the magnitude of the effects observed in this study are small, they do provide added support for the hypothesis that urban form affects health and health-related behaviors. Furthermore, even a change can have important public health implications.
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Last Modified
Aug 06, 2015
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2754 times

Simply Moving: A Guide to Walking, Hiking and Biking Trails in Cumberland and Perry Counties

2013
A publication of the Partnership for Better Health and the Cumberland County planning department.
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Last Modified
Oct 18, 2017
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379 times

The Association Between Lifelong Greenspace Exposure and 3-D Brain MRI in Schoolchildren

2018
Study found that primary schoolchildren who have been raised in homes surrounded by more green space tend to present with larger volumes of white and grey matter in certain areas of the brain. Those anatomic differences are, in turn, associated with beneficial effects on cognitive function.
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Last Modified
Apr 30, 2018
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73 times

The Health Benefits of Parks

2006
Authors: Erica Gies
Organizations/Sources: The Trust for Public Land
This paper discusses how the structure of communities contributes to health. It is a resource for government and volunteer leaders in making the case that parks and open space are essential to the health and well-being of all Americans
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Last Modified
Aug 04, 2015
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2707 times

The Nature of Americans: Disconnection and Recommendations for Reconnection

2017
Organizations/Sources: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
The relationship of Americans and nature is changing. Adults and children alike spend evermore time indoors, participation in activities like hunting and fishing is stagnant or declining, and shifts in social expectations treat engagement with nature as a mere amenity. These trends pose a nationwide problem, since overwhelming evidence shows the physical, psychological, and social wellbeing of humans depends on contact with nature. To monitor these trends and to reveal how to restore this relationship, social scientists conducted an unprecedented study of 11,817 adults, children, and parents across the United States in 2015–16.
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Last Modified
Jan 11, 2018
Viewed
232 times

Why America Needs More City Parks & Open Space

2004
Organizations/Sources: The Trust for Public Land
This white paper outlines the critical need for city parks, particularly in inner-city neighborhoods. It address the social, environmental, economic, health and community development benefits parks bring to a city and its residents.
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Last Modified
Aug 13, 2015
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3061 times