Bookmark and Share
Share

Economic Benefits of Waterways and Wetlands

Economic Benefit of Conserved Rivers: An Annotated Bibliography

2001
Organizations/Sources: National Park Service
This resource offers an extensive list of studies, papers, and articles on the economic benefits of river conservation, with summaries of their content.
Rating
Last Modified
Aug 13, 2015
Viewed
1761 times

Economic Benefits of Wetlands

2006
Organizations/Sources: US Environmental Protection Agency
Wetlands filter and clean water, which decreases the costs of drinking water treatment, and they reduce the frequency and intensity of floods. They support the life cycle of 75% of the fish and shellfish commercially harvested in the U.S., and up to 90% of the recreational fish catch. For example, in South Carolina it would require a $5 million treatment plant to remove the pollutants filtered by the Congaree Bottomland Hardwood Swamp.
Rating
Last Modified
Jul 29, 2015
Viewed
1853 times

The Economic Benefits of Cleaning Up the Chesapeake: A Valuation of the Natural Benefits Gained by Implementing the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint

2014
Authors: John Surrick
Organizations/Sources: Chesapeake Bay Foundation
A first-ever analysis released today by the Chesapeake Bay Foundation (CBF) finds that the economic benefits provided by nature in the Chesapeake Bay watershed will total $130 billion annually when the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint, the regional plan to restore the Bay, is fully implemented. The Economic Benefits of Cleaning up the Chesapeake also reveals that in Pennsylvania, those annual benefits will approach $40 billion.
Rating
Last Modified
Aug 04, 2015
Viewed
1655 times

The Shore at Risk: The Threats Facing New Jersey’s Coastal Treasures, and What it Will Take to Address Them

2010
This report provides an in-depth look at the declining environmental health of the Jersey shore and an examination of the impact this has on New Jersey’s economy. New Jersey’s tourism, municipal water supplies and coastal fisheries depend on the health of the Jersey Shore. The declining health has caused a 20% decrease in total commercial fishery revenues and the need to install a $5 million desalination plant in Cape May.
Rating
Last Modified
Jul 29, 2015
Viewed
1795 times