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Economic Benefits of Outdoor Recreation And Tourism

2006 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation

2006
Organizations/Sources: U.S. Department of the Interior
In 2006, amongst U.S. residents, age 16 and older, 87.5 million people participated in at least one wildlife related recreation activity: 30 million fished, 12.5 million hunted, and 71.1 million participated in at least one type of wildlife-watching activity. Of 6-to-15-year-olds, 1.6 million hunted, 8.3 million fished, and 12 million wildlife watched. Together these individuals spent $122.3 billion on their activities, which equated to 1 percent of the Gross Domestic Product.
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Aug 12, 2015
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2011 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation

2012
Organizations/Sources: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
In 2011, amongst U.S. residents ages 16 and older, 90.1 million people participated in at least one wildlife related recreation activity: 33.1 million fished, 13.7 million hunted, and 71.8 million participated in at least one type of wildlife-watching activity. Of 6-to-15-year-olds, 1.8 million hunted, 8.5 million fished, and 11.7 million wildlife watched. Together these individuals spent $122.3 billion on their activities, which equated to 1 percent of the country's Gross Domestic Product.
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Jul 29, 2015
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2017 Outdoor Recreation Economy Report

2017
Organizations/Sources: Outdoor Industry Association
Outdoor recreation is among America's largest economic sectors. It is the lifeblood of thousands of communities and provides livelihoods for millions of workers. Outdoor Industry Association issued the first Outdoor Recreation Economy report in the early 2000s; this third edition takes a broader view of the growing industry and its shifting demographics. It is the largest, most comprehensive survey of its kind, and includes results for all 435 U.S. congressional districts in addition to national, regional, and state results.
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Jul 26, 2017
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326 times

Birding in the United States: A Demographic and Economic Analysis

2011
Organizations/Sources: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Survey identifies common characteristics of birders in the U.S. and estimates that they spend $40 billion on travel and equipment.
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Sep 20, 2017
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135 times

Economic Impact of Pennsylvania’s Heritage Areas, 2008

2008
Organizations/Sources: Heritage PA
State Heritage Areas are large geographic regions or corridors of the Commonwealth that span two or more counties and contain a multitude of historic, recreational, natural and scenic resources of state and national significance that collectively exemplify the heritage of Pennsylvania. In 2008, visitors to 8 of 12 heritage areas, both from Pennsylvania and out of state tourists, generated an estimated $255.8 million in direct sales, which supported 4,372 jobs.
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Jul 29, 2015
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Economic Importance of Sportfishing in the Matanuska-Susitna Borough

2009
Study shows that annual sport fishing activity in this Alaska municipality generates more than $63 million in spending on goods and services, accounting for over 900 jobs. Fishing also produces over $6 million in state and local taxes.
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Sep 19, 2017
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107 times

Pennsylvania Ecotourism: Untapped Potential

1995
Organizations/Sources: Center for Rural Pennsylvania
This guide provides a variety of resources and ideas to establish local ecotourism. Use it to enhance the economy while identifying, teaching, sharing, and preserving unique natural areas that make communities special.
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Aug 13, 2015
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Pennsylvania’s Wildlife and Wild Places: Our Outdoor Heritage in Peril

2003
Authors: Ben Moyer
In Pennsylvania, sprawling development consumes 350 acres per day and that pace may be accelerating. The sights, sounds, smells and experiences that distinguish rural Pennsylvania and bring Pennsylvanians outside to hunt, fish, and wildlife watch are being lost forever. The report suggests five recommendations to preserve Pennsylvania outdoor heritage, maintain the economic value of wildlife-linked recreation, and sustain rural economies that depend on forests, farms, and outdoor tourism.
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Jul 29, 2015
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State and National Economic Impacts of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Related Recreation on U.S. Forest Service-Managed Lands

2006
Between 2000 and 2003, hunters, fishers and wildlife watchers traveling to U.S. Forest Service (USFS) managed lands specifically for those activities spent $1.7 billion within 50 miles of the USFS unit. As these expenditures were spent and re-spent by businesses, additional economic impacts were created for state and national economies and supported 42,342 jobs and $194.0 million in annual federal income tax receipts.
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Jul 29, 2015
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The Benefits to Business from Hunting and Fishing Excise Taxes

2011
Revenues from an excise tax on most fishing, hunting, and shooting-sports equipment is used for the maintenance and enhancement of America’s fish and wildlife populations. Abundant, sustainable fish and wildlife populations yield abundant and diverse hunting and fishing opportunities, which leads to more purchases of hunting, fishing, and target shooting equipment. This tax shows how investing in conservation and rehabilitation projects that benefit game species, as well as nongame species, brings significant economic returns.
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Jul 29, 2015
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The Economic Benefits of San Francisco's Park and Recreation System

2014
Organizations/Sources: The Trust for Public Land
Study calculates the economic benefits of San Francisco's parks, including $431 million net income from tourist spending and $122 million in boosted property values.
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Sep 20, 2017
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