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Economic Benefits of Urban Greenspace

Benefits of Urban Trees

Organizations/Sources: United Nations
Fact sheet outlines the environmental, aesthetic, economic, and health benefits of trees in urban environments.
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Last Modified
Oct 11, 2017
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219 times

City of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Municipal Forest Resource Analysis

2008
A cost-benefit analysis of Pittsburgh's street tree program using software developed by the USDA Forest Service called STRATUM, showed that Pittsburgh's 29,641 publicly managed street trees provide cumulative benefits to the community valued at an average of $81 per tree annually, for a gross total value of $2.4 million annually. When the city’s annual $816,400 in tree-related expenditures are considered, the net annual benefit to the city is $1.6 million, or $53 per tree per year.
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Last Modified
Jul 29, 2015
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2330 times

Green Investment Strategies: A Positive Force in Cities

2008
Authors: Susan Wachter
Organizations/Sources: University of Pennsylvania
This research in Philadelphia looks at buyers’ willingness to pay more for property in neighborhoods that have undergone greening. Greening works to transform blighted vacant lots through debris removal, community gardens, and newly landscaped commercial corridors.
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Last Modified
Aug 13, 2015
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2507 times

Quantifying Urban Forest Structure, Function & Value:

1997
This paper reviews research concerning urban forest structure, function, and value, with emphasis on results from the Chicago Urban Forest Climate Project. In 1991, the $59 million in benefits from its trees in energy savings, air-pollution mitigation, avoided runoff and other benefits far outweighed the $21 million in costs of planting and maintenance. It takes between 9 and 18 years to pay back planting and maintenance costs.
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Last Modified
Jul 29, 2015
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2611 times

Shade: Healthy Trees, Healthy Cities, Healthy People

2005
Organizations/Sources: Georgia Urban Forest Council
Businesses that invest in trees realize far reaching and ever growing returns: they increase property value, increase the amount shoppers will pay for products, decrease air conditioning needs, and increase employee productivity, satisfaction and retention. Trees decrease health care costs by luring people outside and encouraging increased physical activity and by providing cleaner, safer air.
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Last Modified
Aug 17, 2017
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2614 times

The Determinants of Neighborhood Transformations in Philadelphia, Identification and Analysis: The New Kensington Pilot Study

2005
Authors: Susan Wachter
Organizations/Sources: University of Pennsylvania
Starting in 1995, the New Kensington neighborhood of Philadelphia was revitalized with street tree plantings, the planting of grass and trees on vacant lots, and the conversion of vacant lots to community gardens or side yards for adjacent homeowners. The goals were improving the community’s appearance, curbing population loss, attracting new residents, and encouraging reinvestment. There was a $4 million gain in property value through tree plantings and a $12 million gain through lot improvements.
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Last Modified
Aug 06, 2015
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2605 times

The Economic Benefits of Cleveland Metro Parks

2013
Organizations/Sources: The Trust for Public Land
Study finds that Cleveland-area parks and trails enhance property values, provide recreational opportunities, improve human health, attract visitors, and provide natural goods and services such as filtering air pollutants and managing stormwater. Additionally, they support local jobs, boost spending at local businesses, and generate local tax revenue.
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Last Modified
Sep 20, 2017
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164 times

The Economic Benefits of Denver's Park and Recreation System

2010
Organizations/Sources: The Trust for Public Land
Study calculates the economic benefits of the city's parks, including $18 million net income from tourist spending, $30 million in boosted property values, and $804,000 million in stormwater management savings.
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Last Modified
Sep 20, 2017
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156 times

The Economic Benefits of San Francisco's Park and Recreation System

2014
Organizations/Sources: The Trust for Public Land
Study calculates the economic benefits of San Francisco's parks, including $431 million net income from tourist spending and $122 million in boosted property values.
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Last Modified
Sep 20, 2017
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192 times

The Economic Benefits of Seattle's Park and Recreation System

2011
Organizations/Sources: The Trust for Public Land
Study evaluates the economic value of Seattle's parks, related to property value, tourism, direct use, health, community cohesion, clean water, and clean air. The parks generate nearly $20 million in tax revenue, boost property values by $80 million, and save residents $64 million in medical costs.
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Last Modified
Sep 20, 2017
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254 times

The Economic Benefits of the Park and Recreation System in San Jose, CA

2016
Organizations/Sources: The Trust for Public Land
By providing park areas and access to an array of free or low-cost outdoor activities, such as biking, exercising, exploring nature, gardening, hiking, picnicking, swimming, walking, and wildlife viewing, San José generates numerous economic benefits within the local community. Parks, trails, and community centers enhance property values, provide recreational opportunities, improve human health, attract visitors, and provide natural goods and services such as filtering air pollutants and managing stormwater.
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Last Modified
Sep 20, 2017
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213 times

Why America Needs More City Parks & Open Space

2004
Organizations/Sources: The Trust for Public Land
This white paper outlines the critical need for city parks, particularly in inner-city neighborhoods. It address the social, environmental, economic, health and community development benefits parks bring to a city and its residents.
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Last Modified
Aug 13, 2015
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2808 times