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Home » Library » The Great Allegheny Passage Economic Impact Study (2007–2008)

The Great Allegheny Passage Economic Impact Study (2007–2008)

On average, owners of businesses near or along the Great Allegheny Passage indicated that ¼ of their gross revenue was directly attributed to trail users and two-thirds reported that they experienced at least some increase in gross revenue because of their proximity to the trail. Over one-quarter of all businesses that were surveyed mentioned that they have expanded, or plan to expand, their operations or staff numbers because of the impact of the trail, and between 2007 and 2008 these business attributed $23,878,495 of their revenue to the trail.
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  • The Great Allegheny Passage (GAP) is a 132-mile system of biking and hiking trails that connects Cumberland, MD to McKeesport, PA (near Pittsburgh, PA).
  • On average, owners of businesses near or along the trail indicated that one-quarter of their gross revenue was directly attributed to trail users and two-thirds reported that they experienced at least some increase in gross revenue because of their proximity to the trail. Over one-quarter of all businesses that were surveyed mentioned that they have expanded, or plan to expand, their operations or staff numbers because of the impact of the trail.
  • In general, lodging and hotel establishments and outdoor and trail related businesses reported larger increases in their estimated annual revenue than other business types.
  • Among those surveyed, between 2007 and 2008, $23,878,495 in revenue was attributed to the trail and $4,372,190 of wages were paid to employees of these businesses.
  • In 2007, all businesses on or around the trail had estimated trail attributed revenue of $32,614,703 and distributed $6,273,927 in wages. Despite the hard economic times, in 2008 these figures increased to estimated receipts and wages of $40,677,299 and $7,500,798, respectively.
  • Two-thirds of the trail users stated that they/their group had/planned to make purchases or rent equipment in the communities along the trail or trailhead that day.
  • Four in ten trail users that were surveyed planned an overnight stay as part of their trip. Overnight trail users spent an average of $98 a day in the trail communities.
  • Non-overnight trail users spent an average of $13 a day in the trail communities.
  • All trail users traveled an average of 131 miles to reach the trail. Overnight trail users traveled an average of 289 miles to reach the trail.
  • Over three-quarters of the overnight trail users stated recreation was their primary purpose for trail use. Over half of local and day trip users reported health or fitness as their primary reason for trail use.
  • Surveyed trail users were from nearly every state in the continental United States and parts of Canada.

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Last modified by Gayle Diehl

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